Are you Sick or Are you Tox-SICK?

by Vickie Johnston, Owner and Founder, H2O Health

Do health and clean water have anything do with each other?

The answer is absolutely “Yes”! Cells are water, inside and out. Water washes the inside just like it does the outside. Contaminated water often can contain harmful bacteria, viruses, parasites and an unbelievable amount of toxic chemicals, as well as waterborne diseases such as cholera, typhoid, hepatitis A and E, dysentery, other serious diseases/disorders and can even cause flu-like symptoms.

Yet, the “powers that be” aren’t concerned enough for me.

I love to discuss the importance of clean water, its benefits and the consequences of not having access to it. According to the United Nations, 2.2 billion people around the world do not have access to clean and safe drinking water.

In developing countries, the situation is more severe, many lacking access to clean, safe drinking water. I am thrilled I have been asked by several countries to help them solve issues of poor water quality.

According to WHO (World Health Organization) International Agency on Research, breast cancer will more than double in the next 20 years. How is that possible?

With all the billions spent on research we are much better at detecting cancers and getting early diagnoses, but the problem continues to get worse. Our drinking water can often contain harmful bacteria, viruses, parasites and over 4,000 toxic chemicals that can lead to illnesses and disease.

Illnesses not only affect human health, but can have a domino impact like on lost wages, medical expenses, depletion of retirement savings and even death. According to WHO about 485,000 deaths are caused annually due to diarrheal diseases caused by drinking contaminated water.

Clean water plays a crucial role in maintaining hygiene. It is vital for daily activities such as bathing, hand washing and keeping living spaces clean. Proper hygiene practices are essential in preventing the spread of illness and disease. Without access to clean water, people are at risk of contracting diseases like typhoid, trachoma and scabies.

Pollution of our water resources, including rivers and oceans, can have severe consequences on not only human health but also aquatic life and ecosystems.

Industrial processes and land use changes are the leading cause of increased water pollution.

We need to work together — governments and international organizations — to ensure that every person has access to clean and safe drinking water.